Set sail for a new city

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It was back in the summer of ’14 when I got my hands on the Los Angeles edition of Boat Magazine. The hazy rays that came through the window of the bar I was in seemed to go well with the dusky image on the front cover.

I opened the pages and started to read. Like a good book that you just can’t put down, I quickly found myself  drawn in as discerning articles told of the extraordinariness of ordinary individuals living in the city. But more than that, it was the delicate composition of words that captivated me and a seemingly heightened awareness of the subject matter that isn’t generally found in your average travel magazine. 

From then on, I was hooked and am now the proud owner of six issues of Boat. Not to be confused with maritime glossies, the word ‘Boat’ refers to the ‘floating’ nature of the magazine. Twice a year the team behind it pack up their office and head off to a new city to seek out the stories and the people that help mould a sense of identity about the place. 

The secret to this seems to lie in their approach; by inviting local writers and artists to present their own view of the city they call home alongside visiting contributors, the magazine is able to provide a perspective from both inside and out.  

Invariably, this makes for some pretty diverse reading. My favourite issue on Kyoto, for example, opens with a complex introduction to the city from a resident of 25 years, detailing the intricacies of society and its ability to assimilate new culture. Then follows a feature on ancient forestry practices that are kept alive by a few committed workers while further on, a delicate set of interviews shed light on the hidden lives of the homeless population. 

Yet, for all their individuality, what’s prevalent is a sense of intimacy and sensitivity towards the nuances of place, which threads everything together. The result is a compilation of writing that not only informs, but leaves you with a sense of having glimpsed an inner nature that not many travellers, maybe even citizens, are likely to encounter. This is what keeps me coming back to the magazine rack every six months and its also the reason I’ve kept every issue, so that I might take one out and dip into it, like bottled essence, should life in my own corner of the world become a little dull. 

Urban Investigator strikes again

In case you haven’t_MG_4450 visited the link at the top of the page, I think its about time that I officially introduce  an ongoing project of mine, called Urban Investigator. The project charts the adventures of Leonard Luther, a fictional character, who is stalking the streets of Bristol in order to seek out what could be termed as a ‘sense of place’ about the city.
Combining historical research with descriptive writings and some abstract photography, the aim is to give readers an interpretation of the area as it is encountered by Leonard and bring to life some of the hidden stories that lie in wait in the corners of this city.
At present, he’s been exploring the streets around the Christmas Steps Arts Quarter, where some of the oldest buildings in the city still survive. Once he’s finished there, he’ll be moving on to other areas, so be sure to keep checking back for more adventures.

Click here to read the latest part.